Templates: Football Squares Betting Pool Template

by Michael on October 4, 2007

Football Squares

Football Squares Betting Pool Template for Apple iWork Numbers:

I stumbled upon this fun little Excel spreadsheet for making square sheets for office football pools, and decided to port it over to Numbers.

Most of the formulas are intact, but I did have to make several modifications in order to make it work.

I also need to mention that this is for entertainment purposes only, and you should consult all applicable laws in your area before organizing a football pool. In other words, I will not be held responsible for what you do with this sheet.

Usage:

  1. Place a check mark in the Hide Numbers box at the bottom of the page.This will place “?” in all the header and row squares.
  2. Fill in the Home and Visitor teams at the bottom of the sheet.This will place the teams into the headers and rows of the sheet without need of manual typing.
  3. (Optional) Change the background and text colors to match the respective teams.
  4. Print the spreadsheet
  5. Collect 100 initials, one per box.
  6. Enter the initials in the appropriate cell.
  7. Remove the check mark from the Hide Numbers box at the bottom of the sheet.Note: Numbers will re-generate random numbers every time a cell changes, so make sure this is the last thing you do before the next step.
  8. Print the final spreadsheet.

For those of you not familiar with how these pools work, I found a good explanatory article here. Quoting from a section:

Betting “squares” are probably the most common form of Super Bowl pool. It requires no knowledge of the game, just some luck.

To set up the pool, the organizer draws up a 10-by-10 grid. The grid’s length is designated for one team and the width for the other. For a price, bettors choose or are assigned “squares” within the grid.

After the squares are filled, a number between zero and 9 is assigned to each row and column, giving each square holder a number for each team. If the number in the bettor’s square match the last digit in the score at the end of each quarter, that bettor wins.

For example, a bettor could draw the 7-3 square, 7 for the Patriots and 3 for the Eagles. If, at the end of the first quarter, the Patriots were ahead 17-3 the 7-3 square would be a winner. Smaller prizes are usually awarded to the winners of each quarter and a grand prize goes to the person whose square reflects the game’s final score.

With 100 squares available, prize totals are 100 times the cost of each square. So charging $50 a square will yield a $5,000 pot.

Edit: 10/5/07 – Fixed sheet to show 0 rather than 10. Thanks, Jason.

Download Football Pool Squares Template for Numbers

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